This consultation is now closed.

IGEM thanks contributors for their interest in this review and for sharing their views.


Overview

Over the last 10 years there have been many changes to the way Victoria manages emergencies. These changes are meant to improve the way we prepare for, respond to, and recover from major emergencies such as bushfire, flood, storm, and heatwave.

For example, Victoria's emergency management agencies (such as police, fire, state emergency service and ambulance) can now send information and warnings to your phone, and Apps such as Vic Emergency will allow you to see all emergency information and warnings across Victoria.

We want to understand if you think the changes to emergency management arrangements in Victoria are helping you and your community before, during, and after major emergencies.

We invite you to share your views and experiences in this survey.

Your views, along with those we have gathered from organisations and agencies from Victoria’s emergency management sector (such as police, fire, state emergency service and ambulance) will be included in the Inspector-General’s report to the Minister for Police and Emergency Services.

What is a major emergency?

The questions in this survey are about major emergencies.

A major emergency is the kind of event that puts (or could put) your safety or health in danger, or that destroys or damages (or could destroy or damage) property and our environment.

Major emergencies bring a lot of harm. It takes a long time for things to get better afterwards.

Some examples of major emergencies are the heatwave and Victorian bushfires in 2009, the floods in 2010 and 2011, the Hazelwood Coal Mine Fire in 2014 and thunderstorm asthma in 2016.

This consultation is now closed. IGEM thanks contributors for their interest in this review and for sharing their views.

About this survey

This survey has 21 questions and they are grouped in five parts:

  • before an emergency
  • during an emergency
  • after an emergency
  • your experience
  • about you.

You can answer all the questions, or you may just want to answer some of the questions. The survey uses a few ways for you to give your answer.

Some of the questions are about your own experiences.

If the questions make you feel upset or worried you can exit the survey at any time by leaving this page. You can also get help anytime by telephoning:

  • LifeLine 13 11 14
  • beyondblue 1300 224 636

Depending on where you live you may experience different natural hazards.

Hazards are things like fire, flood and storm.

When hazards threaten to - or cause - damage to lives, property and the environment, they become emergencies.

You can find out the hazards in your area by typing your postcode, your town's name, or your municipality in the spaces at the top right corner of the map below.


Before an emergency

Sharing responsibility when preparing for emergencies makes people safer.

Sharing responsibility means that emergency management agencies work with people and their communities before, during and after emergencies. There are times when the agencies have greater responsibilities than others; for example, the fire agencies are generally more able than people to identify the known risks about bushfire.

People in communities who are actively involved in preparing for emergencies understand their emergency risks, and know what to do if an emergency occurs.

The organisations and agencies from the emergency management sector (such as police, fire, state emergency service and ambulance) have changed how they communicate and work with people and their communities, especially Victorians who may become vulnerable in an emergency because of physical ability, mental health, literacy and language spoken.

The following questions will help us understand what you think is most important to help you get ready for an emergency such as a bushfire, flood, storm, and heatwave.

Getting ready

The table below has two columns.

The left column has a list of things you could do to get ready for an emergency.

Drag what you think is most important from the left column and drop in the right column in order of what is most important to you.

If you think something is missing from this list there is a space at the end of the table to tell us about it.

  1. Helping my local community get ready for emergencies #
  2. Knowing how and where to get the latest information about emergencies happening in my area #
  3. Having a household plan for what to do in case of the emergencies #
  4. Having access to community education programs that can help me to prepare for an emergency #
  5. Knowing what to do if an emergency happens #
  6. Knowing what emergencies are most likely to happen in my area #
  7. Knowing what options are available to me #
You have 1000 characters left.

Getting information

The next questions are about the information you use to find out about getting ready for emergencies.

Having useful and up to date information helps you know what to do to get ready for an emergency such as a bushfire, flood, storm, and heatwave.

This information could include instructions on what is happening and what you should do.

Emergency management agencies try to provide you with as much information as they can to help you to make good decisions to protect yourself, the people you love, and the things you value most.

2. Where do you (or did you) get information to help you get ready for an emergency?

Click the box to tell us how you’ve found information. Choose all that apply.

Rate 1 star (not useful at all) to 5 star (very useful)

4. If you had help to get ready before an emergency please tell us who helped you

Click all the boxes that apply

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You have 1000 characters left.

During an emergency

The emergency management sector has changed how it works together with people and their communities during emergencies.

During an emergency, organisations and agencies from Victoria’s emergency management sector (such as police, fire, state emergency service and ambulance) work to have trained staff and volunteers with the right skills, technology and equipment in the right place at the right time to be able to help Victorians.

The following questions will help us understand what you think is most important to help you during an emergency such as a bushfire, flood, storm, and heatwave.

Getting help

The table below has two columns.

The left column has a list of things that organisations and agencies from Victoria’s emergency management sector (such as police, fire, state emergency service and ambulance) use to help you during a major emergency.

Drag what you think is most important from the left column and drop in the right column in order of what is most important to you.

If you think something is missing from this list there is a space at the end of the table to tell us about it.

  1. Being able to get up to date information about the emergency #
  2. Having different agencies (police, fire, rescue and ambulance) working together during an emergency #
  3. Having the right equipment (trucks, planes, bulldozers) used at the right time and place to respond to the emergency #
  4. Having the right technology (radios, computers, social media, drones) used at the right time and place to respond to the emergency #
  5. Having the right number of skilled people responding to the emergency #
  6. Knowing that emergency personnel are trained to manage emergencies #
  7. Being warned about emergencies happening in my area #
  8. Knowing where I should evacuate to if i need to #
You have 1000 characters left.
8. If you have had help during an emergency please tell us who helped you

Choose all that apply

You have 1000 characters left.
You have 1000 characters left.

After an emergency

Recovery and rebuilding after an emergency helps people return to their daily life, even though things may have changed for them.

Recovery means getting back to a normal state or getting back in control after an emergency. It can include both short-term relief and recovery activities and longer-term support for people and their communities.

These sorts of activities include getting help to clean up your home after a flood; a place to stay if your home was damaged by a bushfire or a storm; being given money to help buy clothes and food if you had to leave home; and support that can help you understand whats happened to you.

Rebuilding means fixing or repairing damage or starting from scratch to build something new.

When emergencies create lasting damage, restoring peoples’ wellbeing and rebuilding homes, facilities and infrastructure is important to recovery.

The emergency management sector has changed how it works with people and their communities to help them recover and rebuild after major emergencies.

The following questions will help us understand what you think is most important to help you after a major emergency such as a bushfire, flood, storm, and heatwave.

Getting help

The table below has two columns.

The left column has a list of things that organisations and agencies from Victoria’s emergency management sector (such as police, fire, state emergency service, health and council) do to help you recover and rebuild after a major emergency.

Drag what you think is most important from the left column drag and drop in the right column in order of what is important to you.

If you think something is missing from this list there is a space at the end of the table to tell us about it.

  1. Getting help and support immediately after an emergency #
  2. Getting help for as long as I need #
  3. Getting the financial help quickly #
  4. Being able to rebuild or return to my home #
  5. Being able to rebuild or return to my farm or business #
  6. Being able to get information when I need it #
  7. Getting support to help me cope emotionally #
  8. Rebuilding the essential services in my community so that it returns to normal #
  9. Getting support so that I (or people in my household) can return to work or school #
You have 1000 characters left.
12. If you had help with rebuilding and recovery after an emergency please tell us who helped you.

Select all that apply

You have 1000 characters left.

Please tell us in the space below

You have 1000 characters left.

Your experience

Sharing your experiences of emergencies will help us understand more about what changes have worked and what we can do to improve.

Changes may include how you prepare for an emergency, how you get information, and how you learn about emergencies

You have 1000 characters left.
16. Have you been involved in an emergency in Victoria in the last 10 years?
17. Which emergencies have happened in your area?

Below is a block of photos showing six types of emergency. Under the block of photos, tick the box against the type of each emergency which has happened in your area.

18. Have you been helped by the emergency services in Victoria?

Tick all that apply to you

You have 1000 characters left.
You have 1000 characters left.
You have 1000 characters left.

About you

We're interested to know more about you and your community.

This information will help us to understand more about Victorians and emergencies.

We will not be able to tell who you are from the information collected and we will not be using this information for any other purpose than this review.

Your postcode will help us understand more about hazards and emergencies in your area

How long have you lived in your current area?
I am sharing my views because...

Click all that apply

For example, English is not your preferred language or you need to assistance to walk.

You have 1000 characters left.

The survey form is now closed. Thanks for your contributions.


More information about this review

No.

IGEM is not re-examining event details, nor the findings or recommendations made by inquiries and policy papers such as:

  • 2009 Victorian Bushfires Royal Commission
  • Review of the 2010–11 Flood Warnings & Response
  • Victorian Emergency Management Reform White Paper - 2012
  • 2014 Hazelwood Mine Fire Inquiry
  • Review of response to the thunderstorm asthma event of 21–22 November 2016.

IGEM will not re-address the monitoring activities conducted and acquitted on behalf of the Victorian Government, other than where communities raise concerns as to the longer-term effectiveness of strategies implemented in response to recommendations made.

Organisations involved in this review include:

  • Australian Red Cross
  • Country Fire Authority (CFA)
  • Department of Jobs, Precincts and Regions (DJPR)
  • Department of Education and Training (DET)
  • Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning (DELWP)
  • Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS)
  • Department of Premier and Cabinet (DPC)
  • Department of Treasury and Finance (DTF)
  • Emergency Management Victoria (EMV)
  • Emergency Services Telecommunications Authority (ESTA)
  • Local Government Victoria (LGV)
  • Metropolitan Fire and Emergency Services Board (MFB)
  • Municipal Association of Victoria (MAV)
  • Victorian Council of Churches (VCC)
  • Victorian Council of Social Service (VCOSS)
  • Victoria Police (VicPol)
  • Victoria State Emergency Service (VICSES)

How we use your information

Information shared with us is treated confidentially. It will not be published and we do not know your identity. The Inspector-General for Emergency Management will store all information securely and it will only be used for the purposes of this review.

We will keep you updated as our review progresses, including how the information collected has helped us and about future consultations. We will do this by posting updates online www.igem.vic.gov.au and through out Twitter account @IGEM_Vic.

You can also provide your email through the "Stay Informed" link at the top of this page to get updates on this review. Your email address will not be shared with anyone and will not be linked to your survey answers.