Overview

The Framework for Trauma Informed Practice is being developed to promote the physical, emotional and cultural safety of people in contact with services for children, young people and families. The objective of the Framework is to reduce risk of re-traumatisation and support the wellbeing and healing of both service users and staff.

A trauma informed approach has long been considered good practice in addressing the high prevalence of trauma experienced by people in the service system. An unsafe response can escalate and compound trauma, resulting in additional harm. This can trigger distress, create barriers to recovery and prevent future engagement with support services.

A trauma-informed approach upholds the safety, dignity and wellbeing of both people using and people delivering services. It is supported through policies, principles and practices at practitioner, service and system levels that centre on empathy and reflection; that seek to understand, rather than pathologise; and that recognise people as experts in their own lives. Working with, rather than working for, is a key tenant of a trauma informed approach.

Table

The development of the Framework for Trauma Informed Practice prioritises the voice of lived experience. It seeks to build enhanced and consistent ways of working with people experiencing trauma across child and family services, including family violence services.

Your role in shaping the framework

**This online consultation has been extended until 5pm Wednesday 19 June 2019.


Please complete the survey below to help shape the development of the Framework for Trauma Informed Practice for child and family services, including family violence services.

The information presented in the survey reflects key themes from experience, the literature and evidence base on trauma informed practice.

We want to hear your perspectives, what more needs to be considered, and how the Framework can best be applied across different settings. We welcome diverse perspectives from service users, community members, services and other experts.

Important information

Please note, this survey is not the mechanism to seek assistance, report on issues of concern, or provide information on personal or consumer experiences. In case of emergency or immediate danger, please call ‘000.’

If you have formed a reasonable belief that a child has suffered or is likely to suffer significant harm as a result of abuse or neglect please contact Child Protection via contact information at https://services.dhhs.vic.gov.au/child-protection-contacts.

For further information on seeking support from appropriate services see the contact information below.

Support Contacts

If anything on this web page raises any concerns or issues for you, or for someone you know, please contact a relevant support service We have provided contact information below for a number of Victorian support services.

Emergency Services: In the case of an emergency or immediate danger please call ‘000’

Child Protection: https://services.dhhs.vic.gov.au/child-protection-...

After Hours emergency: 13 12 78

Orange Door: https://orangedoor.vic.gov.au/

LifeLine: https://www.lifeline.org.au/ or 13 11 14

1800 Respect: https://www.1800respect.org.au/ or 1800 737 732

Kids Helpline: https://kidshelpline.com.au/ or 1800 55 1800

Parentline: https://www.parentline.com.au/ or 1300 30 1300

Mens Referral Service: https://www.ntv.org.au/ or 1300 766 491

Victims of Crime Helpline: https://www.victimsofcrime.vic.gov.au/


For information on trauma informed practice you may like to visit:


Please note: All survey responses will be de-identified, but please be advised that if you have a registered account with Engage Victoria and you are logged in while submitting a survey this may mean that your account details are captured in connection with your completion of the survey. This may result in your survey responses not being de-identified. To ensure your survey responses are de-identified, please ensure you are not logged in to Engage Victoria while submitting a survey.

Survey

Section 1: About you

Q1. Please select the option that best describes you: Required

Select all that apply.

This could be either through advocacy, accessing or delivering services.


Section 2: Defining key terms

The following terms will be used within the Framework. We want to know what you think about each definition. Does it include all the right elements? Is there something you would add or change?

Q3a. Therapeutic approach

Broadly, a way of relating that intends to support, empathise and be of value to the person with whom one is communicating (and to do no harm). An approach in which a practitioner engages clients with a view to support healing from harm, prevent further harm, build resilience and/or empower individuals, families and communities.

You have 300 characters left.
b. Trauma

“Individual trauma results from an event, series of events, or set of circumstances that is experienced by an individual as physically or emotionally harmful or life threatening and that has lasting adverse effects on the individual’s functioning and mental, physical, social, emotional, or spiritual well-being.” (SAMHSA 2014) Collective trauma can also be experienced by whole communities of people. For example, this is apparent in groups of people with shared experiences (such as surviving a natural disaster, forced adoption or institutional abuse) and in Indigenous populations and people from refugee backgrounds who have been exposed to violent dispossession and physical, cultural and spiritual genocide over long periods of time.

You have 300 characters left.
c. Violence

A violation of rights and/or physical, emotional or cultural safety, which can be: which can be: Interpersonal (relational), structural (disadvantage, discrimination and social exclusion), institutional (a service response that perpetuates harm), lateral (within communities), intra-personal (self-harm).

You have 300 characters left.
d. Intersectionality

“‘Intersectionality’ refers to the ways in which different aspects of a person’s identity can expose them to overlapping forms of discrimination and marginalisation. These aspects can include gender, ethnicity and cultural background, language, socio-economic status, disability, sexual orientation, religion, age, geographic location or visa status. This amplifies barriers to services, increases the risk of social isolation, and exacerbates social and economic disadvantage, including housing insecurity.” (sourced from DHHS Diversity and Intersectionality webpage).

You have 300 characters left.
e. Cultural safety

“An environment that is safe for people: where there is no assault, challenge or denial of identity, of who they are and what they need. It is about shared respect, shared meaning, shared knowledge and experience of learning, living and working together with dignity and true listening.” Australian Human Rights Commission.

You have 300 characters left.
f. Aboriginal self-determination

“Aboriginal self-determination encompasses a spectrum of rights that are necessary for Aboriginal Victorians to achieve economic, social and cultural equity, based on their own cultural values and way of life. This includes rights to: not be discriminated against; enjoy language, culture and heritage; land and natural resources; have access to the basic necessities of life and be economically self-sufficient; make decisions that impact their lives from a position of wellbeing and empowerment; ‘grassroots community’ having ownership and responsibility for their own affairs and their own communities, including through designing and delivering policy and services on their own terms, setting their own funding priorities and holding their service providers accountable.” (Victorian Aboriginal Affairs Framework 2018-2023).

You have 300 characters left.
g. Trauma specialist

Trauma specialist services provide trauma-specific interventions explicitly intended as treatment for people in relation to their experiences of trauma.

You have 300 characters left.
h. Trauma informed

Trauma informed services are designed and delivered in ways that recognise that both people using and people working in services may have experienced trauma. Trauma informed services are not directed at treating trauma but rather endeavour to ensure that the service experience will not cause further harm and distress. They do this by incorporating principles and values that support wellbeing and applying them in a dynamic and reflective ways across the service environment, workforce, culture, policy and practice.

You have 300 characters left.
i. Trauma informed practice

Trauma informed practice is an approach that is cognisant of the pervasive prevalence and adverse impact of trauma among both people accessing services and people delivering services. It’s an integrated approach that is holistic, empowering, strengths-based, reflective and collaborative, as well as promoting physical, emotional and cultural safety.

You have 300 characters left.
j. Re-traumatisation

Re-traumatisation occurs when a person who has experienced trauma previously has a physiological and emotional stress response triggered by an event, circumstance or interaction that causes distress. Re-traumatisation occurs when a person’s experience of a service (as a service user or worker) results in further harm.

You have 300 characters left.
k. Inter-generational trauma

Unresolved individual or collective trauma can be transmitted to subsequent generations in a cumulative, prolonged and pervasive pattern. This can occur through parenting relationships and through the “collective, cultural memory” (Healing Foundation 2013) of a community.

You have 300 characters left.
l. Vicarious trauma

“‘The negative transformation in the helper that results (across time) from empathic engagement with trauma survivors and their traumatic material, combined with a commitment or responsibility to help them’ (Pearlman and Caringi, 2009). The greater the exposure to traumatic material, the greater the risk of vicarious trauma. People who work in services to which people with traumatic histories present seeking help, or who work with traumatic material are at particular risk.” (Blue Knot Foundation website).

You have 300 characters left.

Section 3: Domains of the framework

The domains below reflect a range of different concepts that appear in the research on trauma informed practice. We want your input into how well they reflect your perspectives and experiences.

Please note: the department asks that you do not provide any personal information or health information in response to the survey questions.

  • Knowledge: An understanding of trauma including the prevalence, impact and risk of re-traumatisation
  • Safety: Responsiveness to physical, emotional and cultural safety
  • Empowerment: A focus on strengths and resilience, genuine choice and voice
  • Aboriginal Self-Determination: Aboriginal and Torres Strait self-determination
  • Relationship-based: Authentic and attuned engagement, empathic and trustworthy, non-judgemental, and demonstrates active listening
  • Collaboration: Collaborative and partnering approach that shares power whilst balancing risk
  • Wellbeing: A focus on wellbeing, and hope for healing and recovery
  • Holistic: A holistic view of the person that sees and flexibly responds to a person’s culture, identity and context
  • Reflection: Critical reflection and honest self-appraisal that welcomes client feedback on practice, and is supported through supervision and peer support
  • Peer involvement: Client involvement in program and system design and evaluation
  • Integrated: An integrated response across programs, service providers or sectors
Q4. Please select the domains of practice that are working well in your experience, workforce or service.
Q5. Please select the domains of practice that are NOT working well in your experience, workforce or service.
  1. Knowledge #
  2. Safety #
  3. Aboriginal Self-Determination #
  4. Relationship-based #
  5. Collaboration #
  6. Wellbeing #
  7. Holistic #
  8. Reflection #
  9. Peer involvement #
  10. Integrated #
You have 300 characters left.
You have 300 characters left.
Q7. Please select any domains that you think are not applicable for the Framework for Trauma Informed Practice.
You have 300 characters left.
  1. Sector-specific practice resources for the Framework #
  2. Workforce training #
  3. Community of practice/cross-sector practice networks #
  4. Learning tools #
  5. Practice forums #
  6. Group based learning/reflective practice opportunities #
  7. Ongoing communication channels to disseminate learning and resources #
  8. Good practice stories and examples across different practice settings #
  9. Cross-sector leadership forums #
  10. Supervision and management guides #

Privacy collection notice

The Department of Health and Human Services (the department) is committed to protecting your privacy. The department will collect and analyse survey submissions for the purposes of informing the development of the Framework for Trauma Informed Practice.

The department asks that you do not provide any personal information, health information or information on personal experiences in your survey submission. All data collected through the survey will be destroyed immediately following the development of the Framework, in line with the Public Records Act 1973.

Participation in the survey is voluntary. All survey responses will be de-identified, but please be advised that if you have a registered account with Engage Victoria and you are logged in while submitting a survey this may mean that your account details are captured in connection with your completion of the survey. This may result in your survey responses not being de-identified. To ensure your survey responses are de-identified, please ensure you are not logged in to Engage Victoria while submitting a survey.

For further information on the Framework project, or to be advised on consultation outcomes, you can contact the consultation team separately by emailing trauamaframework@dhhs.vic.gov.au.

To contact the department’s Information Sharing and Privacy team please email privacy@dhhs.vic.gov.au.